Hortinova

THYME - Open Pollinated Winter Thyme Seeds

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Thymus vulgaris  

  • Fast growing plant with small, very aromatic leaves and a slightly bitter, peppery taste.  
  • The semi-woody stems and the flowers can be consumed.  
  • Can reach 30 cm in height and tolerates the drought.  
  • Like oregano, it keeps very well dried.  

CANADA NO.1
GERM: 95%
TEST DATE: JAN 2024

Sow thyme seeds indoors about 6-8 weeks before the last expected frost date. Thyme seeds are tiny, so sprinkle them lightly on top of well-draining seed-starting mix and lightly press them down. Keep the soil moist but not waterlogged. Once the seedlings have developed a few sets of true leaves, they can be transplanted outdoors or into individual pots. 

Choose a sunny location for your thyme plants as they thrive in full sunlight. The soil should be well-draining. Thyme will tolerant a wide pH range on either side of neutral (pH 7.0). It does fine in soil from pH 6.0 to 8.0. It is relatively tolerant of poor soil, making it a great choice for rocky or less fertile areas. 

TRANSPLANT: Transplant the seedlings outdoors after the last frost date when the soil has warmed up. Space the plants about 12 to 18 inches apart, allowing enough room for them to spread as they grow. 

WATER: Thyme prefers dry to medium moisture levels, so be cautious not to overwater. Once established, water the plants only when the soil feels dry to the touch. Overwatering can lead to root rot and other issues. 

FEED: Thyme is a light feeder, and excessive fertilization can lead to reduced flavor in the leaves. A balanced, all-purpose fertilizer can be applied sparingly in the spring or early summer. Alternatively, you can use compost or organic matter to provide necessary nutrients. 

PROTECT: Apply a layer of organic mulch around the base of the thyme plants to help retain moisture, suppress weeds, and regulate soil temperature. Thyme is relatively resistant to pests and diseases, especially when grown in well-draining soil with good air circulation. However, keep an eye out for aphids, spider mites, and fungal issues. If necessary, treat with organic insecticidal soap or neem oil. 

PRUNE: Regular pruning is beneficial for thyme plants. Pinch off the tips regularly to encourage bushier growth and prevent legginess. Harvesting thyme leaves frequently also promotes new growth. 

You can start harvesting thyme leaves once the plant has grown to a sufficient size. The best time to harvest is in the morning when the aromatic oils are at their peak. Use scissors or pruners to snip off the stems, leaving some leaves behind to continue the plant's growth. 

Thyme can be dried for later use by hanging the stems upside down in a well-ventilated area. Alternatively, you can freeze thyme leaves or store them in oil or vinegar to preserve their flavor. 

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